Stikwood: the new peel and stick wood paneling

Stikwood: the new peel and stick wood paneling

Updated:

Provided by Networx.com

Almost everyone has a wall that doesn't look right, or a table, or the back of a kitchen island. Maybe it's an empty bedroom wall that makes the room look cold. Maybe it's a drab beige office wall. Maybe it's an old IKEA table that has seen better days. Perhaps you've been looking for a way to bring natural, harmonizing elements into your space, but you just haven't figured it out.

I just discovered Stikwood, and I think it is a brilliant solution to all of the above situations. With Stikwood, any room can look like it has artisanal bespoke reclaimed wood, or smooth bamboo, walls built by an earnest San Francisco carpenter. Don't have a remodeled condo in the Mission? Ha ha, neither do I. But with the help of Stikwood, our own apartments and condos can have that look.

Stikwood is, in plain language, 1/8 inch thick wooden planks that can be affixed to a clean, sanded surface with adhesive strips that are factory-mounted on their flip sides. While not a total beginner's project (the planks need to be cut down to size with a power saw), "the world's first peel and stick solid wall planking" is certainly easier to install than regular wood paneling.

Like bead board wallpaper, Stikwood is able to create the illusion of custom trim woodwork, for a fraction of the price and time. Sourced and manufactured in the USA, it's a pretty green product. The company claims that Stickwood products are VOC free, which is great for people with sensitivities to scents, which can be triggered by remodelers using noxious adhesives and paints.

The photos of customers' projects on Stikwood's Tumblr are pretty inspiring. One customer used Stikwood to cover the back side of a kitchen island. Another totally changed the look of a living room by covering a wall with it. Another customer framed a fireplace with it (it's flammable like all wood; it appears that the fireplace is not in use).

Have you tried Stikwood? I'm excited to try it myself. With so many possible DIY applications and a fairly reasonable price, Stikwood is an attractive new material to work with.

Chaya Kurtz writes for Networx.com.

  View original post.

Powered by WorldNow
Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices