Cold caps tested to prevent hair loss during chemo

Cold caps tested to prevent hair loss during chemo

Posted: Updated:

By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) - U.S. researchers are about to test a way to thwart 1 of chemotherapy's most despised side effects - to see if giving the scalp a deep chill can prevent hair loss.

The idea: Cooling the scalp during chemo slows blood flow, making it harder for cancer-fighting drugs to reach and harm hair follicles.

The approach is widely used in Europe and Canada, where several types of so-called cold caps are sold. But the Food and Drug Administration hasn't approved their use in this country.

The new study asks if it's time for that to change. This summer, researchers will begin recruiting 110 breast cancer patients to strap on the DigniCap during their chemo sessions. Photos of their hair will show how well the cap works.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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