Just one lane closed on Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge

Just one lane closed on Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

The Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge is almost back to normal after a tractor trailer caught fire on the lower level Friday morning causing gridlock.

On Saturday evening, all but one lane had reopened and traffic flow was starting to return.

Currently, one lane on the upper level remains closed until further notice going towards Queens.

Summer Saturdays usually bring a welcome reprieve from Manhattan gridlock but that wasn't the case today. The good news is things on the East Side are almost back to normal but for a lot of drivers it was not easy to get around.

Cranky drivers clogged the East Side Saturday trying to get onto or around the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge a day after a massive truck fire damaged the structure.

Fox 5 asked some drivers how long it they were waiting to get onto the bridge.

“Oh at least a half an hour, been circling around -- it’s tough,” said one driver.

“It’s been slow, it’s been slow,” added another.

Workers spent Saturday inspecting the bridge and repairing a damaged floor beam. That meant multiple closed lanes and headaches for drivers trying to get home to Queens from the Upper West Side.

Frustrating? Yes, very. I'm trying to get home; I've been at work since six in the morning.

Traffic cops were stationed throughout Midtown East in an attempt to bring order to the mess. At one point, officers closed a section of 59th Street to alleviate some of the congestion headed straight for the bridge, but that didn't deter these drivers who simply weren't willing to detour.

But by 7:30 p.m. Saturday night all but one of the lanes had reopened, and traffic was finally beginning to flow again -- a welcome relief after two days of gridlock.

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