Elliptical bicycles gain fans in New York

ElliptiGo

Elliptical bicycles gain fans in New York

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

You may have seen people riding what looks like a cross between an elliptical machine and a bicycle around New York City. So I decided to give the ElliptiGo a go.

"It's an attention getter. If you're shy, don't ride this," said Michael Gostigian, a former Olympic athlete. "If you want get attention, step on that and you'll be turning heads all day."

And not only does it turn heads, it's a total body workout.

"It works 34 percent more metabolically than riding a regular bike," Gostigian said. "Here you're standing up, you have to have very good posture, you're using different muscles than you would be bicycling, and you're actually mimicking the running stride."

Gostigian was a pentathlete in the Olympics. He works as a personal trainer in New York City. He discovered the ElliptiGo a few years ago when he was battling injuries after years as a competitive runner. On his first ride, he did 62 miles and felt absolutely no pain the next day.

"It's weight bearing, but you're not pounding down on the pavement every time," he said. "So it's really much easier on the body, much easier on the joints. … I had a person who had hip replacement surgery and after five weeks he was able to ride this, no problem."

Gostigian now owns four ElliptiGos and trains clients on them in Central Park.

I got the chance to test one out.

Gostigian said it's not only a great workout; it's a great way to see your surroundings.

"It's fun! You're above all the traffic," he said. "It's like riding a horse in a way."

One of his clients loved it so much he bought one for himself.

"When I first got it, it's a little awkward you know because it's not exactly like a bicycle," Michael Degennaro said. "But once you got the knack and learn how to ride and balance, it's fantastic."

While it is fantastic, it's also pricy. The ElliptiGo starts at about $1,500, but you can rent one at various bike rental locations around the city.

So if you're looking to change up your usual fitness routine, the ElliptiGo just might be the way to go.

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