Facial treatment with pumpkin, yam and avocado

Facial treatment with pumpkin, yam and avocado

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Pumpkin packs a nutritious punch when it comes to beauty treatments. The squash is making a new appearance this fall, in the form of hair products, sweet-smelling face masks, and moisturizers.

Dr. Stafford Broumand, a plastic surgeon on the Upper East Side, says the power pumpkin resurfacer has become the most popular treatment in the fall line-up.

"Initially we have the skin prep for 2 to 4 weeks, they come in we place a pumpkin pulp on the skin after prepping it," Broumand says. "They will feel tingling, we neutralize it, when they walk out they will feel as if they had a glow."

Pumpkin pulp is packed with vitamin A. That combined with a number of different acids gets rid of fine wrinkles, tightens the pores, and reduces pigmentation.

"I went to the beach and didn't apply my sunscreen like I should have," Stephanie Lombardo says. "I am left now with pigmentation. After going through six treatments of it, it lightens it, it leaves you with a really nice glow."

For the best results, the doctor recommends six treatments.

If you're looking for a more relaxing vibe, check out celebrity facialist Joanna Vargas.

"Your skin will really drink in all the vitamins and nutrients in this mask," she says.

Vargas' clients include Emma Stone, Michelle Williams, and Mandy Moore. She created the superfoods facial herself.

"It's loaded with enzymes, enzymes are a really safe way for someone to exfoliate that's gentle on the skin but will really make the skin glow," she says.

I gave the mask a try. First there's a microderm abrasion to exfoliate the dead skin. Then Joanna applies the yam and pumpkin mask. It smelled delicious, good enough to eat. Every mask is personalized here. For instance, my skin was really dry so Joanna added the pumpkin and avocado oil to hydrate the skin.

"It's my personal philosophy if you feed the skin the right vitamins and nutrients in every season you're going to have great looking skin," Vargas says.

Prepping is not necessary for the treatment. If you're looking for something new this fall, give these super food squash beauty treatments a try.

My treatment felt awesome. I felt like a new woman.

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