Mob boss 'Whitey' Bulger moved to Brooklyn

Mob boss 'Whitey' Bulger moved to Brooklyn

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James "Whitey" Bulger James "Whitey" Bulger

BOSTON (AP) — Convicted Boston crime boss James "Whitey" Bulger has been moved out of Massachusetts to a federal lock-up in Brooklyn, N.Y., according to the website of the Federal Bureau of Prisons.

Bulger, 84, had been held at the Plymouth County House of Correction since his capture in Santa Monica, Calif., in 2011 after more than 16 years as a fugitive.

Bulger was sentenced by a federal judge earlier this month to two consecutive life sentences plus five years. In August, a jury found him guilty in 11 of the 19 killings he was accused of, along with dozens of other gangland crimes, including shakedowns and money laundering.

It was not immediately clear how long Bulger will stay at the Metropolitan Detention Center before he is permanently assigned to a federal prison. The facility is described as an administrative facility that houses male and female inmates.

A message left with Bulger's attorney, J.W. Carney, was not immediately returned.

The U.S. Attorney's office in Boston, which prosecuted the case, has made no request related to Bulger's prison assignment, according to a spokeswoman for the office. The bureau is not bound by any recommendations from prosecutors, judges or other parties when determining where an inmate will be housed.

The former boss of the Winter Hill Gang, Boston's Irish mob, Bulger fled the city in 1994 after being tipped off by a former FBI agent that he was about to be indicted. His disappearance became a major embarrassment for the agency when it was learned that corrupt Boston agents had taken bribes from Bulger and protected him for years while he worked as an FBI informant.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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