Manhattan seniors protest sale of their building

Manhattan seniors protest sale of their building

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

The warm temperature didn't stop Upper West Side seniors from rallying for perhaps the most personal cause: not wanting to be moved out of their homes.

The Salvation Army plans to sell the Williams Memorial Residence at 95th Street and West End Avenue to a developer for just over $100 million. That means 352 units of affordable housing for its senior tenants, many of them long term, will be gone.

The Salvation Army says it will relocate the Williams seniors to a new state-of-the-art residence and community center replacing a facility at 125th Street and 3rd Avenue in East Harlem. Maj. James Betts says it's a cheaper option than renovating the Williams residence, which needs major upgrades. The Salvation Army can use the money from the sale to invest in the program, he says.

But Williams resident Carol Muster points out that uprooting one's life in the twilight years is not an easy thing to do.

The seniors and their supporters say they are not giving up. They plan to explore other options to save their building.

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