Made with Code seeks to encourage girls to enter tech industry

Made with Code seeks to encourage girls to enter tech industry

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Google has pumped $50 million into an initiative to get more girls involved in coding and other tech sectors. An event in Chelsea kicked off the initiative.

Tahirah Moses, 13, is among the girls the companies like Google want to reach to let them know that they can have a future in computer science.

"We need a lot more of kids to come to computer science, these are incredibly fun jobs," said Megan Smith, a vice president of Google X. "We found less than 1 percent of girls are expressing interest in these fields despite the amazing impact we have."

Moses, a Girl Scout from Brooklyn, is among the 160 girls attending Made with Code, an event hosted by Mindy Kaling of "The Mindy Project," aimed at showing that everything from fashion to jewelry to animation starts with computer science. And just walking into the interactive exhibit opened her eyes.

"Now that I'm looking at it from a different perspective than usual I feel like this could be something that I could look forward to in the future."

Google is teaming with the Girl Scouts and other groups including Girls Who Code, whose founder Reshma Saujani said the goal is to convince more girls they can succeed in computer science despite what popular culture may say.

"Our girls constantly get messages whether it's a doll that says 'I hate math let's go shopping instead' or the fact that you can walk into a Forever 21 and get a T-shirt that says 'Allergic to algebra' we're constantly telling our girls this is not for you," Saujani said.

The Made with Code initiative is a three-year program. The ultimate goal is to have an equal number of men and women in the tech sector.

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