HGH poses threat to teen users

HGH poses threat to teen users

Posted: Updated:
CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) -

A drug called human growth hormone (HGH) is being abused by teens, and there’s a deadly reality.

A new study revealed that in just one year the amount of teens who reported using synthetic human growth hormones has doubled.

“A lot of them are going for that college scholarship, some of them are just for body image enhancement and thinking that extra little edge will put them over the top, so they can do better on the field or the court and get that college scholarship they’re so hard working for,” said ex-high school athletic trainer Brian Robinson.

Robinson was a high school athletic trainer in Chicago for 37 years and said the HGH rate of abuse is alarming.

“Everything trickles down to the lower levels, the professional athletes were using it years ago, it trickled down to the college athletes and now it’s trickled down to high school as well,” Robinson said.

The partnership for Drug-Free Kids said that athletes hope human growth hormones will give them a competitive edge, increased muscle and quick weight loss.

HGH is a hormone produced in the pituitary gland that muscles and bones develop naturally. However, a synthetic version was developed to treat patients with muscle wasting diseases like aids and chronic renal failure.

Some athletes, though, looking for an edge started using it in addition to or as an alternative to steroids, but many teens only think short term and don’t know the hidden dangers.

“The problem is people always think that if a little is good then a lot must be even better, and when it comes to the human body that is not the case. while a little is good and the amount that we naturally produce is very beneficial to growth and development, if you get too much it causes tumors, liver failure can lead to death and have very negative effects,” said Dr. J. Martin Leland III.

The study also said that most students may not even be taking the genuine HGH, which can only be administered via injection – which can become even more dangerous.

“What you find in muscle supplements is not synthetic human growth hormone at all and it can be any sort of mixture of cocktails of vitamins or minerals or synthetic things that are essentially untested and are very dangerous,” Leland added.

Dr. Leland said it’s hard to tell if teens are on HGH until their health problems have become serious, and without regular doping tests in schools, you might not know your teen is doping until it’s too late.

“Kids think very short term, they don’t think what’s this going to do to me 10-20 years down the road,” Leland said.

Dr. Leland also said it's hard to tell if your teen is taking HGH because the teen won't bulk up quickly. However, if your child does start to ask about supplements and working out, it's best to consult a doctor.

Leland recommended simply eating healthy and working out.

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